Books by Willem J. Ouweneel

 

Adam, Where Are You?

by Willem J. Ouweneel

December 1, 2018 | Genesis 1:1

Since the nineteenth century, many Christian theologians have been converted to the theory of evolution – a theory whose scientific tenability they are not qualified to assess, but which they are unlikely to give up. The majority of recent books by Christian academics on this subject have all but surrendered the entire field of origins to an evolutionary "molecule-to-man" view of reality. The central thesis of this book is that those who accept the theory of general evolution cannot at the same time be orthodox Christians because the matter of origins does not belong at the periphery but at the heart of the Christian message.

 

The Heidelberg Diary

by Willem J. Ouweneel

September 1, 2018

The Heidelberg Catechism is one of the most influential guides to Christian doctrine that Protestant Christianity has ever seen, and The Heidelberg Diary introduces and explores the warmth, richness, and steadfastness of the Christian faith that the Catechism has demonstrated for nearly 500 years.

The Catechism was intended for Christian families, so use this book for personal reading, or better yet, study it with your children.

 

The World is Christ’s: A Critique of Two Kingdoms Theology

by Willem J. Ouweneel

August 16, 2017

At root, the Two Kingdoms controversy is a question of how we ought to live in a world that refuses to acknowledge Jesus Christ as Lord. In The World is Christ's, Willem J. Ouweneel details a number of historical, logical, and exegetical considerations surrounding this question, and helps readers understand that everything we do is an act of worship – the issue is whether our worship is directed towards God or away from him.

Includes study questions for personal or group discussion.

 

Power in Service

by Willem J. Ouweneel

November 17, 2016

Willem Ouweneel provides an introduction to Christian political theory in this short work, considering such questions as What is the Kingdom of God? Where is it located, what are the limits of its authority, and how does it relate to human states and governments? In light of the Kingdom of God, what is the Christian’s responsibility to the state?